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11
Sep

Keeping the Commitment By Forming Strong, Mutually Beneficial Partnerships. Discover New Partners during “Collabro-dating”!

Workshop Description Keeping the Commitment By Forming Strong, Mutually Beneficial Partnerships. Discover New Partners during “Collabro-dating”! - Multnomah County Citizen Involvement Committee (CIC) The Multnomah County Citizen Involvement Committee (CIC) will host a panel presentation and interactive discussion focused on strategies for creating mutually beneficial partnerships with other organizations when conducting outreach. Similar to personal relationships, organizations that create mutually beneficial partnerships are more likely to develop sustainable, long-term relationships that maximize the outreach assets and resources each partner can deliver to the other(s). The panelists will be leaders from Central City Concern and the Portland Community Gardens Program—community organizations that have experience forming mutually beneficial partnerships. Within the context of partnerships, they will present information focused on the benefits of mutually beneficial outreach partnerships and how to go about forming them. The information will include their experiences, best practices, lessons learned and related tools. Panelists will then answer questions from the attendees. Attendees will also participate in “Collabro-dating”—a fun and engaging exercise designed to identify and get new partnerships off to a running start. About the Presenter(s) The Citizen Involvement Committee (CIC) of Multnomah County, Oregon was created by a vote of the people in 1984. The passage of the Charter Review Committee’s recommendation amended the county charter to establish the Office of Citizen Involvement as an independent agency charged with providing staff support for the CIC.  Its mission is to involve, inform, and integrate the people of Multnomah County into policy and decision-making within county government. The CIC does not involve itself in the merits of issues, but rather with the merit of the processes that shape the issues.  We inform citizens, connect them with decisionmakers, and help them contribute to final outcomes.  The CIC works to improve connections between citizens and government, and to increase citizen participation. The CIC and its Office were recognized with a 2011 Achievement Award for the CIC Diversity Outreach Training Program by the National Association of Counties (NACo) for implementing an innovative county government program to better serve area residents. The CIC is composed of fifteen citizen volunteers.  Twelve are nominated by neighborhood associations and community groups; three represent other non-profit civic boards and commissions at-large. http://www.multco.us/oci Handout(s) What is Diversity

9
Sep

Uncle Tom, Banana, Oreo, Coconut, Apple…People of Color, We Need to Talk

Workshop Description

Uncle Tom, Banana, Oreo, Coconut, Apple…People of Color, We Need to Talk – Macarre Traynham and Marshall Haskins, Portland Public Schools

Uncle Tom, banana, Oreo, coconut and apple are derogatory terms used to describe people of color perceived as “acting white.” Whiteness is not just exclusive to white people. Whiteness plays a role with all ethnicities because of how minorities negotiate and navigate dominant culture in order to achieve success and acceptance. The way in which minorities consciously or unconsciously internalize dominant cultural norms can influence how people of a similar race can see them as a sellout. Participants of color will learn how to identify how the presence and role of whiteness shows up in people of color and how denial can impact their work for racial equity. Participants of color will be able to identify how whiteness shows up in their actions, thoughts and beliefs; participants will learn how through identifying their own whiteness they are better able to interrupt systemic racism; and participants will learn how to effectively plan and explore whiteness through the use of the Courageous Conversations about Race protocol and Critical Race Theory. All conference participants are welcome to attend.

About the Presenter(s)

Macarre Traynham is the Principal at Metropolitan Learning Center (MLC) in Portland, Oregon. She has been an administrator with Portland Public Schools since 2004 working as the Vice Principal at Benson High School, Jefferson High School and most recently Lincoln High School.  She graduated from Norfolk State University with a Bachelor of Science in Mathematics and taught high school mathematics in Southern California prior to relocating to Portland, Oregon.  She has a Master’s degree in Educational Administration from California State University, San Bernardino, a Continuing Educators License from Portland State University and she has just begun working on her Doctorate in Education at Lewis and Clark College focusing on how dominant culture’s values and beliefs shows up in people of color.

Macarre’s work in education has afforded her the opportunity to work with young minds to help them become caring, responsible and productive members of society.  Her joy comes from watching students take pride in their learning and finding their intrinsic motivation to keep trying even when the work gets difficult.  Her focus at MLC is to continue to increase the achievement of all students while using racial equity to address diversity, opportunity gaps for students of color and culturally relevant teaching practices.

Marshall Haskins is the District Athletic Director for Portland Public Schools. He has served PPS as a teacher, athletic coach, school athletic director, and Vice Principal since 2002. He also served as Self Enhancement Inc.’s Vice President for Operations for over 10 years prior to coming to PPS. Marshall graduated from the Warner Pacific with a Bachelor of Science in Accounting, earned his Master of Public Administration from Portland State University and received both his Initial and Continuing Administrative license from University of Portland.

5
Sep

How to Create a Culture of Solidarity within Targeted Populations

Workshop Description

How to Create a Culture of Solidarity within Targeted Populations – John Wolfe, Kenya Budd and Michael Hulshof-Schmidt, EqualityWorks, NW

Using Anti-Oppressive Practice theory a safe environment will be provided for people to look at their own identities and how those identities can create an awareness of people who are targeted or marginalized.  Ways to become allies and to stand in solidarity will be explored. Racism, Micro-aggressions, homophobia, ageism, misogyny, and power and privilege, including a timeline of key issues in the history of equity and oppression will be addressed. By the end of this session, participants will understand promising and emerging practices related to collaborating for equity, specifically in the areas of solidarity, outreach, and being credible allies. This includes identifying and interrupting microaggressions and other oppressions, understanding identity, and working together as a community.

About the Presenter(s)

EqualityWorks, NW supports organizations of all sizes in achieving their missions in an equitable, inclusive, and effective manner through transformational conversations and a social justice lens. http://equalityworksnw.com/

Michael Hulshof-Schmidt has been a progressive educator for over two decades. He has lived in ten states in almost every region of the country, giving him a deeper understanding of varying cultural norms and differing views of diversity. Michael has worked in a wide variety of environments including private and public K-12 education, colleges, non-profit organizations, and educational consortia. In all of these environments, Michael has been a champion of social justice and has had some formal responsibility for the evolution and caretaking of institutional cultures. Michael teaches Social Justice at the Portland State University School of Social Work.

Michael’s formal education includes a Masters in Social Work from Portland State University, a degree in English from Oglethorpe University and graduate work in Feminist Studies at DePaul. He has formal training in research practices, diversity work, mediation, and education. He has learned and implemented best practices for team building and diversity training, providing consulting to businesses both large and small.

Michael applies a combination of Anti-Oppressive Practice, Eco-Feminist, and Psychodynamic theories as well as Critical Race Theory (CRT) to inform his operational framework. His company – EqualityWorks, NW – integrates the voices of Dr. Howard Zinn, Dr. Beverly Tatum, Dr. Peggy McIntosh, Dr. Marian Wright Edelman, and his mentor, Dr. Ann Curry-Stevens.  Michael’s mission is to create and sustain conversations around race, gender, privilege, and LGBT issues: to speak one’s truth respectfully and with honor.

Kenya Budd is a professional Trainer, Facilitator and Mediator in private practice, she has been mediating since 2004 and training individuals on diversity in the workplace since 2003. The framework for Kenya’s diversity work is grounded in workplace cultural competency, conflict resolution and equity for people with disabilities. As an architect of change, she has been instrumental in policy changes that provide for the inclusion of service animals in training in clinical settings, the addition of ADA modifications to Woodland, WA’s Historic Society’s building requirements, and was lead consultant on issues of inclusion for people with disabilities and people of Color; special commission to leaders in the LDS Church. Kenya has focused her diversity work on creating safe and respectful conversation communities where race, ability, gender, and privilege can be explored in a paradigm that promotes key concepts found in Cognitive Behavioral Theory, Motivational Interviewing Techniques and Transformative Facilitation models.

Kenya received a Bachelors of Arts in Communication and Deaf Education from the University of Maryland, And a Masters Degree in Public Health from Colorado College. She was trained and certified as a mediator at the University of Washington, legal education program and Vancouver Community Mediation Dispute Resolution Center. Kenya has received a wide variety of Diversity training including Building Partnerships Across Differences (BPAD), ADA and Civil rights training-BOLI.

John Wolfe is a Licensed Clinical Social Worker who has a private practice in Portland Oregon.  In addition to his clinical work with individuals, couples and sexual minorities John teaches Social Justice as well as Anti-Oppression Practice and Intercultural Competency at Portland State University School of Social Work.

John brings over thirty years of social work experience including positions of Program Manager, Social Worker, Child Protective Services Worker, Statewide Manager, and Family Therapist.  Additionally, he has experience lobbying for at-risk-girls issues at the Oregon Legislature.

John currently provides training in AOP as well as Case Management and Social Justice.  He has worked with IRCO, Impact Northwest, Catholic Family Services, Portland Police Department, State of Oregon Department of Human Services, Sisters of the Road Cafe, and Multnomah County as well as other organizations and programs.

John is a published author and poet.  His belief in moving humanity to greater inclusion, acceptance and tolerance of difference is critical to doing ‘the work’ as a change agent.

Handout(s)

CRTTimeline-2

EWNWGlossaryofTerms

 

2
Sep

Korean vs USA – Two Opposite Cultures

Workshop Description

Korean vs USA – Two Opposite Cultures – Bobby Lee, Governor’s Office

This workshop looks at how to recognize ways to improve cross cultural communications as the community is getting more and more diverse. It will explain the physical location, North Korea vs. South Korea, climate, diet, populations mix, cultural, demographic and historic difference between Koreans and Americans. It will help public agencies better understand and appreciate an emerging population, thus keeping the promise of celebrating diversity in our region.

About the Presenter(s)

In late 2011, Governor John Kitzhaber appointed Bobby Lee to his administration to manage the Regional Solutions Center in the Portland Metropolitan region, a State agency team that works with local and federal governments in solving complex regional community development problems. Prior to the appointment he served as Strategic Planning Manager for Hynix Semiconductor, world’s second largest semiconductor manufacturer, for six years. He was responsible for corporate affairs including environmental services, strategic planning, government affairs, power negotiation, and semiconductor market analysis, while also serving as the company’s spokesperson. In 2007, he participated in international trade mission to Asia with Governor Ted Kulongoski. For five years he served as Director of Organizational Affairs for Worksystems Inc., workforce development non-profit agency for city of Portland, and Multnomah and Washington counties. His background also includes serving on the Eugene City Council, Oregon State Board of Higher Education, US President Bill Clinton campaign staff, McKenzie Watershed Council, Asian Council, Oregon Workforce Partnership Board of Directors, and Eugene Area Chamber of Commerce Board of Directors. He was elected as ASUO President for University of Oregon student body where he received his undergraduate and graduate degree in public administration.

 

2
Sep

It’s About You – Gaining, Understanding and Using the Personal Perspective in Diversity and Inclusion Work

Workshop Description

It’s About You – Gaining, Understanding and Using the Personal Perspective in Diversity and Inclusion Work  – Kathleen Saadat and Joseph M. Quinones

Knowing yourself is a key element to effective work in the field of diversity and inclusion. Our understanding of the world is grounded in our individual, family and community experiences. Our “identity” is grounded in these experiences. The combination of our experience, education, training, along with the emotional impact of each, is the foundation of our Personal Perspective. Our Personal Perspective is the filter through which we engage with the world, including our work.

We, individually and collectively, are the links between the past, present and future. How we approach diversity work and the level of our commitment is based on our Personal Perspective.  Our perspective can change over time given new information, experiences and changes in political climate.  Knowing ourselves helps us understand and meet the challenges of Diversity work which can be emotionally demanding, as well as gratifying. Self-knowledge and self-understanding can aid us in maintaining our equilibrium and purpose.

This workshop will provide participants with the opportunity to explore and gain an understanding of the effect of Personal Perspective on diversity and inclusion work. It will also provide information and techniques that will assist participants in sustaining their work.

About the Presenter(s)

Coming soon.

Handout(s)

Bridges and Barriers

Diversity Bingo

2
Sep

Catching Yourself in a “What I Thought I Saw” Moment – Moving Beyond (Mis)Perceptions

Workshop Description

Catching Yourself in a “What I Thought I Saw” Moment – Moving Beyond (Mis)Perceptions – What I Thought I Saw, Peta Owens-Liston

Stereotyping rules how we perceive each other. What stories and opportunities are we missing out on because of our reflex to judge based on our first impression or that first mental paragraph of who we think somebody is? During this interactive presentation, accompanied by a traveling exhibit, we become more self-aware of our own judgments and all the “what I thought I saw” moments surrounding us. We explore the complicated nature of our visual intelligence and how our impulse to stereotype influences the way we perceive the world around us because we see the world through a highly personal and imperfect visual lens.

About the Presenter(s)

Peta Owens-Liston is the author of the book and traveling exhibit, “what I thought I saw” – a “movement” to raise self-awareness about the stories we miss when we judge or stereotype. With the exhibit, she has presented at schools, universities, at conferences and in corporate environments. A seasoned freelance writer, Peta’s styles range from corporate to creative, journalistic to first-person narrative. She has worked for Time magazine and National Geographic.

www.petaliston.com

 

2
Sep

Toward Community: On Racial Justice, Inclusion and Sustainability

Workshop Description

Toward Community: On Racial Justice, Inclusion and Sustainability – Cat Goughnour and Stephanie McBride, Uniting to Understand Racism

Theories of justice, inclusion and sustainability, creatively implemented, can yield more cohesive and thriving communities.  Given Oregon’s fraught history of exclusion, overt and covert discrimination, how do we ensure that moves to increase equity, opportunity, and access yield outcomes that are fair and just for all residents?  How do we foster social inclusion, cohesion and sustainability so that our society and community members thrive?

This workshop will give participants an opportunity to learn how to use the history of the region to find holistic, inclusive and responsive solutions that increase access to opportunity and just outcomes for generations to come.

About the Presenter(s)

Cat Goughnour, MSc Sociology: Race, Ethnicity and Post Colonial Studies from the London School of Economics (University of London); BA Social and Political Philosophy from Portland State University. Certified Multnomah County Community Health Worker, grant writer with the Regional Research Institute for Human Services at Portland State University, certified race facilitator with Uniting to Understand Racism (2013), Office of Equity and Human Rights Equity Training and Dialogue Program participant (2012), presenter and consultant on racial justice, and dedicated community advocate/activist.

Stephanie A. McBride, M.Ed., Faculty, Portland State University, Graduate School of Education. Former high school social studies teacher. Co-founder of the Secondary Dual Educator Program (SDEP) for Oregon licensure in general education and special education for middle level and high school teacher candidates. (www.ceed.pdx.edu/sdep/) Volunteer presenter for OSSCC (www.oregonsafeschools.org/) and member of the Board of Directors for Uniting to Understand Racism (www.understandracism.org/).

Handout(s)

Toward Community

2
Sep

Oh – Those Superficial Differences!

Workshop Description

Oh – Those Superficial Differences! – Linda Banks and Barbara O’Hare, Voices Matter, LLC

The contemporary demographics of the U.S. explain where we are today in the U.S. and why it’s necessary to have these conversations in 2013 – 2014; The Oregon Historical Racial Timeline speaks to the yesterday of racists policies, bigoted policies and narrow mindsets of the past.  Oregon’s real history seems to elude students as well as teachers. We are living with the institutionalized remnants of the past and these are some of the reasons why we are still struggling with those same issues today; The Diversity Commonality Game is a participatory game that has a physical aspect and a visual aspect that should make some of the points of the game more memorable. If we can learn from today’s lessons, maybe we don’t have to repeat them tomorrow.

Through a combination of presented material, small group discussions and activities, participants will gain techniques that enable them to discover, and practice the process of consensus building and collaboration among differences.

About the Presenter(s)

Linda Banks is a dynamic human resources certified administrator with a strong record of achievement combining skills in multiple areas of diversity and inclusion, organizational development, group/staff program development & project management, building partnerships and community relations. She is experienced in the operation of leading numerous first class successful diversity programs, establishing & leading, employee affinity groups and five of PGE’s Diversity Summits.  Linda supports and contributes to many diverse community based and non-profit programs.

Linda is a lifelong learner.  She believes in bringing unity and harmony to any environment within her sphere of influence.  She is and is committed to bringing diverse groups together in a positive environment to learn & improve performance.

Barbara O’Hare has been a facilitator of race dialogues and diversity workshops for 15 years in 3 school districts in the Portland Area. She was a 10 year Board Member of Uniting to Understand Racism and a trainer for 6 years with Uniting to Understand Racism. Barbara is a 27 year retiree from the United Airlines Public Affairs Office. She worked as an Account Executive in Seattle, Salt Lake City, San Francisco and Portland. She holds a B.S. in Arts & Letters from Portland State University. She serves on 3 non-profit Boards: Youth, Rights, Justice – Attorneys At Law; Learn English/Spanish Through the Arts and Airway Science for Kids.

Barbara has facilitated and co-facilitated groups such as the Forest Grove School Board, Hillsboro Police Department/Hillsboro City Employees, Multnomah County Sheriffs, Hillsboro High School, Forest Grove High School, Grant High School, City of Portland, the Portland Police Department, The Forest Grove Police, The Gresham Police Department, the Vancouver Police Department and has conducted numerous community dialogues with various cities in the Portland Area.

Handout(s)

RACEDefinitionsTerminologyBrief13Aug28

VoiceBrochure13Oct04bo

2
Sep

White Allyship – People of Color Weigh In

Workshop Description

White Allyship – People of Color Weigh In – Muna Idow, Dora Perry and Emily Rice, City of Portland

The concept of “white allyship” is used great a deal in racial justice and racial equity work.  However, it is White people who largely use the term and apply it to themselves as supporters of the “cause”.  People of color have not been asked or consulted about what this term means to them.  What is their experience?  Do they define it differently?  Are the expectations and assumptions the same?

This workshop will provide a forum for such a conversation.  The workshop will explore the concept of white allyship, examine the challenges to white allyship, and create a safe space for participants to dialogue about challenges and opportunities.

About the Presenter(s)

Muna Idow is a seasoned and inspired facilitator of difficult conversations on race, racial equity, Islamophobia, and inter-faith issues.  At the Office of Equity and Human Rights, Muna, leads the Citywide Equity Committee, a city-wide effort aimed at institutionalizing racial equity at the City of Portland.   Muna has trained over 4,000 individuals across Washington and Oregon including elected officials, law enforcement, K-12 students, teachers and administrators, university students and faculty on various equity and human rights issues.  Most recently, Muna trained and coached over 40 community members and City staff on how to effectively facilitate dialogues on race and institutional racism.

Muna has appeared on OPB’s Think Out Loud and KBOO’s Asian Compass discussing issues of race, human rights, Islamophobia, women’s rights, and equity. She is the recipient of the 2006 International Peace and Understanding Award from the Washington Education Association, the 2006 Excellence in Leadership Award from One America, and the 2005 Multicultural Excellence Award from the Washington State Association for Multicultural Education.

Dora Perry brings a passion for social justice and community activism to her policy work for the City of Portland.  Dora has facilitated inter-group and work place dialogues for over 13years. Dora is a graduate of the University of Washington (go Huskies!!) and completed graduate studies in Urban Planning at Portland State University.   She worked with internal and external leaders to help establish the Office of Equity and Human Rights and served as an interim Director for six months.  Dora has provided training for several groups and facilitated challenging conversations on institutionalized, nationality, micro-aggressions, and institunalized racism, body image, and diversity and communication across cultures.

2
Sep

Barriers to Racial Equity

Workshop Description

Barriers to Racial Equity – Muna Idow, Dora Perry and Emily Rice, City of Portland

Racial equity calls for an intentional examination of how communities of color have historically been marginalized due to institutional and structural racism.  Further, racial equity means critically analyzing inequitable organizational policies and practices and making meaningful change.  Racial equity is inherently about inclusion and this workshop will allow participants to gain valuable skills in clearing hurdles to their work on racial equity and promoting inclusion as an organizational value. It workshop will explore obstacles to racial equity work for practitioners to all levels of an organization, examine ways of overcoming those obstacles, and provide participants with tools to sustain racial equity over the long-term.

About the Presenter(s)

Muna Idow is a seasoned and inspired facilitator of difficult conversations on race, racial equity, Islamophobia, and inter-faith issues.  At the Office of Equity and Human Rights, Muna, leads the Citywide Equity Committee, a city-wide effort aimed at institutionalizing racial equity at the City of Portland.   Muna has trained over 4,000 individuals across Washington and Oregon including elected officials, law enforcement, K-12 students, teachers and administrators, university students and faculty on various equity and human rights issues.  Most recently, Muna trained and coached over 40 community members and City staff on how to effectively facilitate dialogues on race and institutional racism.

Muna has appeared on OPB’s Think Out Loud and KBOO’s Asian Compass discussing issues of race, human rights, Islamophobia, women’s rights, and equity. She is the recipient of the 2006 International Peace and Understanding Award from the Washington Education Association, the 2006 Excellence in Leadership Award from One America, and the 2005 Multicultural Excellence Award from the Washington State Association for Multicultural Education.

Dora Perry brings a passion for social justice and community activism to her policy work for the City of Portland.  Dora has facilitated inter-group and work place dialogues for over 13years. Dora is a graduate of the University of Washington (go Huskies!!) and completed graduate studies in Urban Planning at Portland State University.   She worked with internal and external leaders to help establish the Office of Equity and Human Rights and served as an interim Director for six months.  Dora has provided training for several groups and facilitated challenging conversations on institutionalized, nationality, micro-aggressions, and institunalized racism, body image, and diversity and communication across cultures.